Famous Former U.S. Citizens – Oscar-winning actor Yul Brynner (Tax Rates Then and Now)

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Yul Brynner was born as Yuliy Borisovich Briner in 1920 in Russia.

He won an Academy Award for best actor and two Tony Awards for the King and IYule B Declaration P1He also played the Egyptian king Ramses II in The Ten Commandments.

He started the process for naturalization of U.S. citizenship in 1943 according to the document, Declaration of Intention, filed with the U.S. federal district court in the Southern District of New York.

Note the photograph and prior residence identified as Dairem South Manchuria,      

as his last place of foreign residency; which is a major port city located in China in the  Liaodong peninsula.  Apparently, Dairem is popular with Russian tourists.  He was Russian.

Yule B Declaration P2

This is particularly interesting, since Yul Brynner was Russian and apparently moved to what was then known as “South Manchuria”?

He renounced citizenship in 1965 in Bern, Switzerland, apparently for tax reasons according to a biography about his life.

The highest U.S. federal income tax rate in 1965 was 70% (compared to today’s 39.6% rate). See, Personal Exemptions and Individual Income Tax Rates, 1913-2002.  The income tax rate was substantially higher then, compared with the current rate, although it is a bit like comparing “apples” and “oranges”; since the tax deductions, exemptions and credits that existed in 1965, look little like the current law.

Social security taxes in 1965 were about 1/2 the tax rate as today, but it only applied to the first US$4,800 of income (which represents about $36,125 in inflation adjusted dollars today).  Current social security rates apply to the first $117,000 of income, without limits on the Medicare portion of 2.8%.  For historical social security rates, see,

 

 

 

请点击这里查看本帖子的中文版本。 Please click here to view the above in Chinese.

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