Part II: Who is a “long-term” lawful permanent resident (“LPR”) and why does it matter?

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A post in August 2014 explained the basic rule of who is a  “long-term resident” as that technical term is defined for tax purposes in IRC Section 877 (e)(2).  There is much confusion about how the tax law defines a “lawful permanent resident” (“LPR”) versus Chart - USCs Who Renounce Compared to LPRs who Abandonhow immigration law defines what is almost the same concept.  The statutes are different and have definitions in two separate federal codes (Title 26, the federal tax provisions and Title 8, the immigration law provisions).

See   –

Who is a “long-term” lawful permanent resident (“LPR”) and why does it matter?

Posted on August 19, 2014

This follow-up comment is to highlight some key concepts about why it matters if you become a “long-term” resident as that term is defined in the tax law.

  • A LPR can reside for substantially shorter periods in the U.S. (shorter than the apparent 7 or 8 years identified in the statute), and still be a “long-term resident” per IRC Section 877 (e)(2) depending upon the facts of any particicular case.Table 4  Country of Brith of LPRs 2012

 

  • There are far more LPRs who abandon their status (formally) than U.S.  citizens who formally take the oath of renunciation.  See the table above reflecting those who have formally renounced U.S. citizenship versus those who have formally abandoned their LPR status.

 

  • Plenty of LPRs informally abandon their LPR status for immigration purposes by moving and living permanently outside the U.S.

 

 

  • There are plenty of timing issues for LPRs surrounding how and when they have “abandoned” their LPR status for purposes of IRC Section 877 (e)(2).  See –

Timing Issues for Lawful Permanent Residents (“LPR”) Who Never “Formally Abandoned” Their Green Card, Posted on August 15, 2015

 

 

 

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